Blogs | Bellwether Education Partners Skip to main content

Blogs

You are here

Blogs

Our team blogs regularly on a broad range of topics related to education reform and provides a blend of leading-edge perspectives. One of Bellwether’s greatest strengths is that diversity of viewpoint is encouraged among the partner team and throughout the organization. Everyone at Bellwether is committed to dramatic improvements in our public education system, but internally there are different views about how to accomplish that work. As a result, the views expressed in these blogs should be considered to be those of the writers rather than organizational viewpoints of Bellwether or of any organizations or individuals with whom Bellwether works. Likewise, outgoing links do not constitute any type of endorsement of other websites or organizations.

Ahead of the Heard

The Bellwether team blog, Ahead of the Heard, features regular commentary, analysis, and original insights from our staff.

Bellwether Education Partners

In celebration of National Intern Day on July 28, we asked Bellwarians to reflect on the valuable lessons they’ve learned through past (and present) internships.  Gage Matthews, summer 2022 intern, Policy and Evaluation  My Bellwether internship has been incredibly valuable for learning about career paths, interacting with diverse teams of skilled and influential professionals, expanding […]

The post Celebrating National Intern Day appeared first on Ahead of the Heard.

Eduwonk

Andrew Rotherham provides education news, analysis, and commentary through his widely read blog, Eduwonk.com. 

arotherham

Over the past year and a half I wrote a few posts on Loudoun County and how the “narrative” about it was often at odds with the facts on the ground. From an October 2021 post:

A common response to those posts was the idea this Loudoun controversy was all partisan, it was transphobic, it was much ado about nothing. In fact, the local newspaper, The Washington Post, could barely be bothered to report on it in any depth until today. It was freelance journalist Matt Taibbi – far from a local – who did the most definitive deep dive.

This is the key takeaway from a grand jury report released today about Loudoun’s handling of two sexual assaults:

There really aren’t words for such a failure of institutional responsibility to young people. It reminds me a lot of Parkland although thankfully no one was killed.

The report also includes chapter and verse of the school division’s effort to thwart this investigation. Too much to pull quote here, but if you think this entire parents rights and transparency issue is BS that Glenn Youngkin cooked up, well just read it.

Education media, that assiduously managed to avoid this story, might ask themselves why? The role of journalists is to ferret out facts, not parrot political narratives. That it was the Daily Wire or Taibbi looking into this rather than, or at least in addition to, our sector’s ed media (and hometown paper The Post) is a blemish on the sector. Stuff like this is inexplicable, a kid was raped. A preventable assault happened.

The tell should have been that every time, multiple times, the courts had an opportunity to shut down this investigation they didn’t. The most sensational narratives – from the idea on the right that trans students were marauding in bathrooms to the idea on the left that this was all BS – should have been suspect. But it was clear something was going on and local officials were not being transparent.

Education advocates and leaders might ask why they, too, as with Parkland, lost their voice in the face of a politically complicated set of circumstances where, again, we are talking about fundamental issues of student safety.

Seems like that applies more broadly than just LCPS?

Teacher Pensions

Teacherpensions.org, a project of Bellwether Education Partners, provides high-quality information and analysis to help stakeholders – especially teachers and policymakers – understand the teacher pension issue and the trade-offs among various options for reform.