Hailly T.N. Korman | Bellwether Education Partners Skip to main content

Hailly T.N. Korman

You are here

Hailly T.N. Korman
She/Her/Hers
Senior Associate Partner
Policy and Evaluation

Background: Hailly T.N. Korman is a senior associate partner at Bellwether in the Policy and Evaluation practice area and focuses on the intersections between schools and other child-serving systems. Hailly supports schools and their public agency partners as they work to craft practices that significantly improve outcomes for system-involved students, and she advocates for reforms that mitigate the institutional obstacles to providing high-quality education services to youth, particularly those served in institutional settings.

Prior to joining Bellwether, Hailly provided direct support to an emerging cohort of reform-minded education and youth justice system leaders across the country. Previously, she was an attorney at Morrison & Foerster LLP, where she served as pro bono counsel in Reed v. State of California, representing student plaintiffs at underperforming Los Angeles public schools challenging the constitutionality of strict reverse-seniority layoffs. In 2010, she received both Public Counsel’s Impact Litigation Award and the ACLU’s Social Justice Award for her work on that case. Before law school, Hailly spent nine years teaching primary grades; she has also taught an undergraduate seminar at UCLA on education policy and politics and a “know your rights” course at a local alternative high school. 

Hailly is a graduate of Brandeis University with a major in politics and minors in legal studies and education. She holds a J.D. from UCLA School of Law, where she was a member of the Public Interest and Critical Race Studies programs and the Collegium of University Teaching Fellows. She is also an alumna of Education Pioneers (LA ’08) and Teach For America (LA ’02).

Why I do this work: The intersection of education and the justice system is a deeply personal place for me and for far too many communities in this country. We are facing a national crisis, and I do this work with the hope that one day, I will put myself out of a job. Helping young people to find a life trajectory that allows them to choose their future is the work of education; doing that for those students who need our best most of all is nothing short of liberation.

Experience at Bellwether: Strategic Planning; Analysis; Human Capital/Organizational Design; Performance Improvement/Sustainability; Grant Development and Implementation; Financial Analysis and Modeling; Implementation Planning; Policy Research and Analysis; Writing; Research; Project Management; CMO/Charter School Operators; District Schools; Foundations; Think Tanks; Advocacy Organizations; Other Public Agencies (e.g., child welfare, probation, youth services)

Client segments served: K-12 Schools; Postsecondary/Higher Education; School Districts; CMO/Charter Schools; State Education Agencies; Government; Foundations and Grantees; Nonprofit Organizations; Policy Organizations; Advocacy Groups; Product and Service Providers

Sample clients: Washington, D.C., Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE), El Dorado County Office of Education, Utah State Board of Education, RALLY, WestEd, National Partnership for Juvenile Services

Recent Media

Publication
Paul Beach
Brian Robinson
Hailly T.N. Korman
Linea Koehler

Today, and on any given day in the U.S., tens of thousands of students are attending school behind bars. Juvenile justice education fails many of these students, resulting in a double punishment for youth: the punitive experience of incarceration for their alleged offense and the potentially catastrophic disruptions of their educational pathway.

Bellwether Education Partners’ new report, Double Punished: Locked Out of Opportunity, reviews juvenile justice education policies in all 50 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico. We focused our review on three related sets of policy tools that are crucial for improving outcomes for youth who are incarcerated: governance, accountability, and finance. While each of these policy tools creates opportunities for reform, designing all three to be mutually reinforcing has broader impact at the system level. However, our review of current state policies shows that there is much to improve.